Research Highlights Gauss Centre for Supercomputing e.V.

Research Highlights

Combining earthquake and tsunami computer models of the 2018 tsunami in Palu, researchers identified underlying causes of the deadly tsunami.

Researchers from Goethe University in Frankfurt have been using HPC resources at HLRS and LRZ to support the massive Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project. The results were released in the April edition of Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Canadian-German partnership simulates the climate in Quebec and Bavaria over 150 years, primarily focusing on extreme flooding events. The team’s results were recently published in Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology.

Researchers employ HPC to help bring spray simulations to a commercial level. The team’s work was featured on the cover of the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. 

HPC helps researchers understand experiments for observing real-time motion of lithium atoms in bi-layer graphene, paving the way for designing new materials for batteries and other electronics.

German scientists have succeeded in observing electron motion in real time by using laser pulses and supercomputing simulations. In their pursuit to better understand electrons’ behaviour during a chemical reaction, the researchers of the University of Paderborn and the Fritz Haber Institute Berlin have leveraged supercomputing resources at the HLRS to model this phenomenon. Their findings were recently published in Science.

HLRS high-performance computing resources and data-driven machine learning help researchers of the Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE) and the Institute of Aerospace Thermodynamics (ITLR) at the University of Stuttgart model how coal, nuclear, and geothermal power plants could be retrofitted for cleaner, safer, and more efficient and flexible operation.

A multi-institutional team comprised of researchers from the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, the Max-Planck Institutes for Astrophysics and for Astronomy, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, and the Center for Computational Astrophysics in New York gives the cosmology community a world-class simulation to study how the universe formed.

Theoretical physicists and experimentalists collaborate to identify dopants capable of enabling new designs of semiconducting materials.

Multi-disciplinary research team uses theory and experiment on its journey to understand material and geologic processes in high pressure and temperature conditions.

Researchers at LMU and TUM in Munich are up for best paper at SC17 after simulating one of the largest, most violent earthquakes in history.

Researchers at the Technical University of Munich are using satellite imagery and supercomputing to predict city buildings’ risks for structural degradation and damage.

A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Britta Nestler at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences works on the frontline of advanced material design, using computation to model new material properties.

With the help of HLRS's Hazel Hen supercomputer, an RWTH Aachen University team reaches a new milestone in modeling turbulence, paving the road to better power plant modeling and design in the future.

Scientists at the Paderborn University and the University of Duisburg–Essen recently published a paper in Nature about phase transitions. High performance computing resources at the HLRS enabled the investigators to explain the physics behind their unexpected discovery.